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Creative projects by Abigail Ward

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Fleshback: Queer Raving in Manchester’s Twilight Zone

‘Fleshback: Queer Raving in Manchester’s Twilight Zone’ is a Boiler Room and British Council film uncovering stories from Manchester’s LGBT+ clubbing scene.

In the early 90s, Manchester’s queer scene was blown wide open by the Hacienda’s seminal queer party, Flesh and its progenitor Number 1 Club on Central Street. Aided, or some would say ruined, by hit TV show Queer as Folk, the scene entered the national mainstream a few years later.

The film explores this history while revealing all about those carrying the torch of alternative rave culture in the new era, featuring collectives such as Homo Electric, Meat Free, Body Horror, and High Hoops. Each has a different approach and musical feel, drawing in different crowds, yet sharing the same vision. The film uses archive footage to highlight the continuum between Flesh and the parties that are happening today outside of Manchester’s city centre.

The release of the film marks the 30th anniversary of the enactment of Section 28. Section 28 was the last piece of homophobic law in the UK. It stated that councils should not “intentionally promote homosexuality or publish material with the intention of promoting homosexuality” in its schools or other areas of their work. Section 28 was enforced in 1988 before it was repealed in Scotland in 2000 and then 2003 in the rest of the UK.

Steffi, DJ and promoter for Meat Free in Manchester, says, “People are very honest up North, and big movements don’t always wash with the Northerners. We’re not about branding or excluding people. Sexual identity is not at the forefront of our parties.”

Directed by Stephen Isaac-Wilson and produced by Anais Brémond.

We Are Dynamite! Exhibition Opening

Steel Pulse at the Northern Carnival © John Sturrock 1978

Steel Pulse at the Northern Carnival © John Sturrock 1978

Mon 3 September 2018
18:30 – 20:00
Niamos (former Nia Centre)
Chichester Road
Manchester
M15 5UP

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE

The Northern Carnival against the Nazis, a rally and concert held on 15 July 1978 in Moss Side, Manchester, was a defining moment in establishing anti-racism in the city and beyond.

Dubbed ‘the day it became cool to be anti-racist’, the Carnival galvanised North West communities against racist groups, including the National Front. A rally of 15,000 people marched all the way from Strangeways prison to Alexandra Park joining a further 25,000 for an afternoon of music, dancing and unity.

Co-organised by Geoff Brown of the Anti-Nazi League (ANL) and Bernie Wilcox of Rock Against Racism (RAR), the Carnival featured incendiary live performances by pop-punk superstars Buzzcocks and Steel Pulse, the UK’s leading reggae band of the period. Support came from Moss Side reggae band Exodus (later X-O-Dus) and China Street from Lancaster, who had released a single on EMI called ‘Rock Against Racism’.

We Are Dynamite!  –  an exhibition of unseen photos and ephemera – aims to highlight the passion and excitement of the day whilst inspiring visitors to reflect upon a new era of challenge for people opposing messages of racism and division across the world.

Join us for drinks and conversation from 6.30pm.

Special guests: Honey and Patrick from Exodus.

The exhibition will run from Mon Sep 3rd-Sat Sep 22nd 10am-7pm and is FREE.

Our project volunteers would like to speak to anyone who attended the march or Carnival. We are looking to capture memories, images and footage for our permanent digital exhibition. If you can help, get in touch: info@mdmarchive.co.uk

IMAGE: Steel Pulse at the Carnival (L-R) Basil Gabbidon and David Hinds © John Sturrock, 1978

Twitter:
#NorthernCarnival1978
@MDMArchive

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE

Supported by by Heritage Lottery Fund

Thanks to National Lottery players, Heritage Lottery Fund invests money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife.

Supported by Futura

Futura are the north’s leading Rec2Rec headhunting specialists. Established in 2001, they provide experienced recruitment professionals to the very best recruitment agencies in the country.

 

Northern Carnival Against the Nazis: 40th Anniversary project launch

black-kid-with-bubblegum-at-Strangeways

Marchers at Strangeways © John Sturrock 1978

The Northern Carnival against the Nazisa rally and concert held on 15 July 1978 in Moss Side, Manchester – was a defining moment in establishing anti-racism in the city and beyond. The 15,000 people who marched across town and the 40,000 people who danced in Alexandra Park that day didn’t just make racism no longer respectable. They made it uncool.

Co-organised by Geoff Brown (the Anti-Nazi League) and Bernie Wilcox (Rock Against Racism), the Carnival featured incendiary live performances by Buzzcocks, Steel Pulse and Moss Side reggae band Exodus. They were joined by post-punk bands Gang of Four, Frantic Elevators and others, who played on trucks to accompany the marchers.

To celebrate this pivotal moment in Manchester’s fight against racism, Manchester Digital Music Archive and the Ahmed Iqbal Race Relations Resource Centre have brought together the original organisers of the Carnival for a panel discussion and all-day event exploring its impact and continuing relevance today.

This event will also be the official launch of our Heritage Lottery-funded project and exhibition celebrating the Carnival.

12.00 FILMS

A series of historical films introduced by Geoff Brown

Rock Against Racism: Nazis Are No Fun
Who Shot The Sheriff?
Leeds Rock Against Racism

13.45 BREAK

14.00 SPEAKER: Jaheda Choudhury-Potter & Ajah UK

14.15 FILM: A brand new short film on the Northern Carnival Against the Nazis, 1978

14.30 PANEL DISCUSSION

15.45 SHARING MEMORIES

Recording memories  – share your memories of the Carnival with our project volunteers

PANEL

RAMILA PATEL (Bolton Asian Youth Movement)

On July 15th 1978, Ramila Patel of Bolton Asian Youth Movement addressed a crowd of 15,000 anti-racism protesters that had amassed in the car park of Strangeways prison to march across town to Alexandra Park in Moss Side – the main site of the Northern Carinval Against the Nazis. Ramila was asked to give the address by Anti-Nazi League organiser Geoff Brown, following her brave stance against National Front leader Martin Webster at a previous demo, in which she marched alone in defiance of Webster holding a placard saying ‘This man is a Nazi’. Ramila is now Head of Visual Arts at Waterford Kamhlaba United World College of Southern Africa.

BERNIE WILCOX (Rock Against Racism)

Bernie Wilcox was the original organiser of Rock Against Racism in Manchester and was, with Geoff Brown of the Anti Nazi League, one of the instigators and prime movers behind the Northern Carnival Against The Nazis in 1978. Bernie has since forged a successful business career owning specialist recruitment businesses. Anti-racism, socialism and music are still close to his heart.

GEOFF BROWN (Anti-Nazi League)

Geoff became a revolutionary socialist at university in 1968, active in the campaign against the US war in Vietnam. His first arrest was for chalking slogans on his college wall, his second for obstructing a police officer at an anti-National Front protest. Joining the International Socialists (from 1977 the Socialist Workers Party) he moved to Manchester in 1972. When the Anti Nazi League was founded in late 1977 he became its Manchester organiser, helping saturate the city with leaflets, badges and protests and getting fifty coaches and minibuses, about 2,500 people, to the first Anti Nazi League/Rock Against Racism carnival in London in April 1978. Geoff went on to be a union tutor, working with shop stewards and on projects abroad, particularly in Pakistan. He was union branch secretary till he was victimised for his trade union activity, after which he was a part time official for his union, finishing in 2015. He is now active as a historian of Manchester ‘from below’.

Chaired by ABIGAIL WARD (Manchester Digital Music Archive)

Supported by by Heritage Lottery Fund

Thanks to National Lottery players, Heritage Lottery Fund invests money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife.

Supported by Futura

Futura are the north’s leading Rec2Rec headhunting specialists. Established in 2001, they provide experienced recruitment professionals to the very best recruitment agencies in the country.


Photo: Front row action at Alexandra Park, 1978 © John Sturrock

New radio show for NTS

Advert for NTS radio show

My latest radio show for NTS is now available on playback.

The Fall – Lost in Music
Sisters of Transistors – The Don
Wynder K. Frog – Mercy
Soundcarriers – Last Broadcast
LEVELZ – Jazzface
X-O-Dus – See Them-A-Come
Bryan Ferry – The Right Stuff (Dub Mix)
Quando Quango – Atom Rock (Mark Kamins New York Mix)
Only Child feat. Veba – Addicted
John Ellis – Unidentical Twins
The Weather Station – Transmission
James & Brian Eno – Wah Wah
[EXCERPT: SLUMS]
Lonelady – Little Fugue
Sub Sub – Lost in Watts
[EXCERPT: ORDSALL]
Tim Burgess – Oh No I Love You
Graham Nash – Chicago
John Kongos – He’s Gonna Step On You
LeonXLeon – Acid Disco
Charles B – Lack of Love
Denis Jones – 3333
Ludus – Breaking The Rules
Ill – Hysteria
The Montgolfier Brothers – The World is Flat
The Durutti Column – Sketch For Summer
Jon Kennedy – Boom Clack (Martin Brew Remix)
Primal Scream – Screamadelica

https://www.nts.live/

L-R: Denise Johnson (Ged Camera), X-O-Dus (Shutterbug), Gonnie Rietveld of Quando Quango (City Life).

NTS-line-up

The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map

Lapsed Clubber Audio Map , powered by Manchester Digital Music Archive

Manchester Digital Music Archive  has teamed up with Manchester Metropolitan University to develop an online audio heritage map that will tell the story of the rave scene in Manchester in the words of clubbers, DJs, promoters, venue staff, producers and more.

The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map is a place for members of Greater Manchester’s original rave community to preserve and share their spoken word memories of clubbing and its culture during the ‘first decade’ of rave, 1985-1995.

Our interface allows you to record your voice directly into your desktop computer or laptop and pin 60-second sound clips onto a map of Greater Manchester at the exact spots where the events you are recalling originally happened.

You can also listen back to the memories of others.

Popular culture has referenced rave culture in Greater Manchester in print, in major films, on TV and in theatre, but almost always from the perspective of the well-known ‘expert insider’. Focusing on the raving landscape between 1985 and 1995, we are creating the Lapsed Clubber Audio Map with community input, giving the community the opportunity to write its own rave history.

Can you help?

If you went raving in Manchester between 1985 and 1995, we’d like to hear from you. We are looking for people who’d like to share some stories to help us test our map. We will send you a secret log in, allowing you to view and contribute to the map before it is launched. We’ll then ask you to feedback on your experience.

The memories are left anonymously with no username attached to them.

If you’d like to get involved, please email Abigail at info@mdmarchive.co.uk.

GEEK NOTE: This project is an experimental and evolving piece of work based on fusing third party protocols such as Google Maps and Web RTC. The latter, which is new open source software that allows you to record via browsers, is not currently FULLY compatible with iPhones, iPads and Safari. For the best experience, we recommend using a desktop or laptop computer running Chrome or Opera.

The Lapsed Clubber Project is a Heritage Lottery Funded Project based at Manchester Metropolitan University and run by Dr Beate Peter in partnership with Manchester Digital Music Archive (Abigail Ward), Go Bang Design (Ashley Kennerley) and Pin Studio (Paul Hemmingfield).

 

Suffragette City – The Music Event

Saturday March 10th 2018
3pm-4am

The Refuge
Principal Hotel
Oxford Road
Manchester
M60 7HA

As part of the Suffragette City – Portraits of women in Manchester music exhibition, The Refuge will be hosting an all day and night-into-early morning charity music event both to celebrate International Women’s Day and to close off the exhibition’s two-week installation in the public bar.

Music across two floors from an all-star female DJ line up.:

Love Is The Message
In the Refuge Public Bar
3pm – 1am
feat.

* Blasha & Allatt (Meat Free)
* Corinne Drewery (Swing Out Sister)
* Dance Lady Dance
* Abigail Ward (Manchester Digital Music Archive)
* Nongi Oliphant
* Claud Cunningham
* Kirby Leanne Halliday
* Justine Alderman

Move Ya Body
In The Refuge Basement hosted by The Social Service
10pm – 4am
feat.
* Rina Ladybeige
* DJ Paulette
* Gina Breeze
* Kath McDermott
* Disco Mums

There will be collection buckets on the night and a £2 door donation for the Social Service with all proceeds going to Women’s Aid and Manchester Digital Music Archive.

The Suffragette City exhibition is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund.

Iceland: Foreboding Joy

I went to Iceland in January. It was a truly mind-expanding experience. Awesome is a word I steer clear of, but its original definition fits the feeling: inspiring awe, wonder or dread; extremely impressive or daunting, intimidating.

Gazing out at those endless lunar landscapes, filled me with joy, but isn’t all joy tinged with a kind of vulnerability or dread at its passing? This is a mix that attempts to capture those conflicting emotions. It’s a bit chilly!

Three poems by Jónas Hallgrímsson
Ulver – Desert Dawn
Philip Glass – Protest (Jóhann Jóhannsson Remix)
Nils Frahm – Said and Done
Sigur Rós – Meo Blodnasir
Ólafur Arnalds – Árbakkinn ft. Einar Georg
Plaid – Wen
Petar Dundov – Then Life
Emilie Simon – Aurora Australis
Jóhann Jóhannsson – Melodia (Guidelines For A Propulsion Device Based On Heim’s Quantum Theory)
Blanck Mass – Sundowner
Brian Eno – I’m Set Free
A Winged Victory For The Sullen – Atomos IX
Max Richter – War Anthem
Björk – All is Full of Love (Strings Version)
Aphex Twin – Blue Calx
Max Richter – Morphology

Here’s a little 4-minute video of the things we saw.:
Iceland 2017 by Gareth Taylor

Songs in the key of Beatle

I created this mix while high on Night Nurse. It contains some of my favourite Fabs solo tracks and some heartfelt Beatles-inspired moments by other artists. I’ve dug out a couple of curios (a Gene Simmons solo effort, an Eno/Manzanera live track), plus lots of Harrison-esque slide.  As always, there’s an emphasis on the melancholy. Thanks to SJP for ‘Bedspring Kiss’ and numerous others.

01. The Beatles – Because
02. Cian Ciaran – You & Me
03. John Lennon – Steel & Glass
04. 801 – T.N.K.
05. George Harrison – Art of Dying (Take 36)
06. Emitt Rhodes – Ever Find Yourself Running
07. ELO – Telephone Line
08. Paul McCartney – Jenny Wren
09. Jellyfish – Bedspring Kiss
10. The Paragons & Roslyn Sweat – Blackbird
11. Wings – Let Me Roll It
12. Nilsson – Jump Into The Fire
13. Gene Simmons – See You Tonite
14. Todd Rundgren – It Wouldn’t Have Made Any Difference
15. XTC – The Disappointed
16. Aimee Mann – How Am I Different?
17. Paul Weller – Song For Alice
18. Marmalade – Reflections of My Life
19. Field Music – Measure
20. David Bowie – Try Some, Buy Some
21. The Beatles – Because (Love version)

 

Manchester Academy Memories

Manchester District Music Archive is proud to launch a new digital exhibition created in partnership with the University of Manchester Students’ Union.

The exhibition, Manchester Academy Memories, documents the history of concerts and club life at the Students’ Union from 1963 to the present day and has been curated by Abigail Ward (MDMA) and Rod Connolly.

It features 435 digitised artefacts relating to artists such as Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie, The Slits, Daft Punk, Björk, Nirvana, The Kinks, Adele, Prince and Led Zeppelin. Many of these items, which include tickets, photos, press articles and videos, have been uploaded to the archive by the general public.

An introductory essay by Abigail Ward, written to accompany the digital exhibition, is reproduced below:

Manchester Academy Memories: Concerts & Club Life at the University of Manchester 1963-2016

“When entering for the first time a town like Manchester, a stranger, overwhelmed by the new and interesting spectacle presented to him, scarcely dares look this giant full in the face at once…” From “Ireland, Scotland and England” by J.G.Kohl, 1844.

*

‘You ask him.’

‘No, you ask him!’

‘No, you!

This was how it would start.

For my sister and I, aged thirteen and fifteen respectively, the first hurdle to be cleared after seeing an enticing Manchester Academy gig advertised in Melody Maker was persuading our dad to give us a lift. We lived in Preston and were a bit young for the perils of the last train home. We’d been very focused on music since being toddlers, really, but in 1992 things moved up a gear after we experienced our first big gigs: Michael Jackson at Wembley and James at Alton Towers. By 1993 we were in full throttle, obsessed with live music and constantly hatching schemes to witness our heroes play, more often than not at the Academy or one of its smaller sister venues in Manchester University Students’ Union. All I wanted to do was move to Manchester – the music city. By ‘94 I’d managed to move out of my parents’ house and by ‘95 my sister and I had our own band. Three years later, I achieved my ultimate dream: a council flat in sunny Longsight, a mere skip and a jump from the Academy. I started working in a record shop. Listening, playing, watching, selling. I had landed.

During the nineties, I saw some unforgettable gigs at Academy venues, including Manic Street Preachers, Jeff Buckley, PJ Harvey, Tricky and Pulp. (It killed me that I couldn’t get into Bowie in ‘97.) These were potent moments in my young life – euphoric, boozy, full of mystery. I would scrutinise the mix, the drums, guitar pedals, mics, keen to learn how it all worked. Gigs were physically demanding at times (especially at the Academy), and not without the occasional pang of sadness. I can still see Richey Edwards at the Academy in ‘94, rail-thin and scabby, hanging over his microphone stand like James Dean in Giant, not even pretending to play guitar any more.

I saved all of my tickets, many of which feature in this digital exhibition, which has been an absolute joy to curate. Funded by the University of Manchester Students’ Union, the project was conceived as a way of celebrating the 25th anniversary of Academy 1, whilst exploring the cultural legacy of all of the University venues, from 1963 to the present day. And it’s not just about the big names that have passed through the venues, it’s about the social and political histories that are inextricably entwined with the music. These are particularly evident in the cuttings we’ve included from student newspapers The Manchester Independent and the Mancunion. We hope you enjoy these glimpses into student life across the decades.

Whilst I did spend a number of days seeking out material for this project in physical archives, many of the items included have been uploaded by the general public: crowd-sourced heritage in action! Thank you to everyone who has made a contribution.

Ticket: Jeff Buckley, Manchester University, 1995. Courtesy: Abigail Ward

Ticket: Jeff Buckley, Manchester University, 1995. Courtesy: Abigail Ward

Manchester Academy (now Academy 1) opened in 1990 on Oxford Road, following years of debate about an extension to the main Students’ Union building (erected 1957) a little further down the road. Gigs and club nights had been promoted by the Union since 1963 across a number of places:

The Main Debating Hall (now Academy 2)
The Hop and Grape (formerly Solem Bar, now Academy 3)
The Cellar (now Club Academy)
UMIST (the Tech Union/Undergound/Barnes Wallis Building)
Whitworth Hall (no longer used for gigs)
The Squat (now demolished)

But it was time for a purpose-built venue with a bigger capacity.

Costing £1.2 million, the Academy originally housed a bank, a bar and a catering facility. It opened with a capacity of 1500, rising to 2000 soon after. It was run on a commercial basis; profits from band nights and club nights were funnelled back into the Students’ Union. Fittingly, the first musicians to grace the stage were Manchester punk icons Buzzcocks on October 7th 1990.

Taken from the Mancunion newspaper, written and edited by University of Manchester students.

Some months before the opening, the Union appointed a full-time Entertainments and Marketing Manager, Sean Morgan, who swiftly entered into a partnership with Manchester-based promoters SJM Concerts (founded by Simon Moran), allowing SJM first option on gig dates for local and visiting artists. Live music was flourishing nationwide; it was boom time for both parties.

In an interview for this project in September 2016, Morgan said, ‘I was ambitious. I was empire-building. I wanted to run the biggest venue complex in the country and put the most gigs on. At one point we put twenty-six bands on in one week.’

‘We worked really hard to see off the competition. Bands and their crews knew that if they came to the Academy, we’d look after them, y’know, take ‘em out on the lash afterwards. They could go to the International 2 [in Longsight] and be stuck out in the middle of nowhere, or they could come to us and get looked after.’

During Sean’s 21-year tenure he was responsible for booking some huge names across all four Academy venues, including Nirvana, Radiohead, Dizzee Rascal, Daft Punk, Patti Smith, Blur, Eminem, The Chemical Brothers and Amy Winehouse. He claims the best gig he ever saw at the Academy was David Bowie in 1997.

‘Bowie was doing a tour of 2000-capacity venues and approached the Academy to play. It was always going to be a “yes”. His sheer showmanship and presence were amazing.’

But Sean’s proudest moments were bringing over his beloved American country stars Townes Van Zandt in 1994 and Scotty Moore (Elvis’s guitarist ) ten years later.

Morgan also oversaw scores of successful club nights, citing rave night Solstice ’91, with resident DJ Dave Booth, as the best atmosphere he ever experienced at the Academy.

In 2011 Sean left the Union and now works for Academy Music Group (no relation). In September 2013, following further refurbishment, the capacity of Academy 1 was increased to 2,600. The venue celebrated its 25th anniversary with a string of significant gigs throughout 2015-16, including Buzzcocks, Garbage and Happy Mondays.

David Bowie ticket book, 1997. Courtesy of Sean Morgan.

David Bowie ticket book, 1997. Courtesy of Sean Morgan.

But how did it all begin?

The Union’s early forays into concert promotion are documented, albeit sketchily, in student newspaper The Manchester Independent. Jazz bandleader Humphrey Lyttleton kicks things off in 1963. A mere two years later Socials Secretary Chris Wright (future co-founder of Chrysalis Records) is booking the likes of the Spencer Davis Group, The Who and The Yardbirds. A Kinks gig at the Rag Ball in March ‘65, however, ends in ‘confusion and brawls’ as the band is bottled off stage. Gig reviews from this period often hint at an element of chaos! Jimi Hendrix stops by in 1967. We’ve included a rarely seen interview with Jimi at the Union by Jill Nichols culled from the Independent.

An interesting story featured in this exhibition is that of the Corporation Act 1965 – a law that allowed venues to be closed on the spot by police if they suspected staff or punters were up to no good. In ‘65 there were around two hundred beat music clubs in Manchester (hard to imagine). They were mainly booze-free members only clubs where young people would drink coffee and dance all night to beat groups. But by the end of ‘66, following the introduction of the act, there were just three clubs remaining. The act was highly unusual in that it was passed by parliament, but applied only to one UK city: Manchester. The city’s music scene was decimated.

In an exclusive interview for this project (which you can listen to within the exhibition), cultural historian Dr. CP Lee says: ‘Against the background of the Corporation Act, it’s hard to overstate the importance of Manchester University for music fans at this time. It was a lifeline. It was our lifeblood. I virtually lived there, even though I wasn’t a student.’

Moving into the early seventies and one of the most intriguing episodes in the Union’s history begins: The Squat.

The Squat was originally the old College of Music. It was situated on Devas Street, between where Big Hands and the Contact Theatre are now. In October of 1973, after the University threatened to demolish the building in favour of a car park, it was occupied by a group of students who were protesting against three things: the student accommodation crisis, the lack of facilities provided by the University for community activities and the proposed demolition of the music college itself. The Squat was turned into a multi-purpose ‘art lab’, with spaces for theatre projects, gigs, band rehearsal and visual art.

For a time, the occupation was financed by a weekly music night held on a Friday in collaboration with Music Force, the socialist music agency put together by, amongst others, renowned blues guitarist Victor Brox and jazz drummer Bruce Mitchell (Greasy Bear, Albertos, Durutti Column).  Music Force was set up in part as a response to the effects of the Corporation Act, which had resulted in a paucity of work for Manchester’s once very busy musicians. The collective provided everything you might require to put a concert on: musicians, PA and equipment hire, flyposting, the full works. The Squat and Music Force both played vital roles in the Manchester punk and post-punk scenes. During its 8-year life the venue played host to New Order, The Fall, The Stranglers, Alberto Y Lost Trios Paranoias and several Rock Against Racism nights.

1981 was a great year for music, which filtered through to gigs at the Union. Bookings included U2, The Au Pairs, Aswad, The Cramps, Linton Kwesi Johnson and The Beat. Things seem to slow down a little gig-wise in the mid-80s, but the Cellar Disco (now Club Academy) packed the punters in. One exhibition contributor reminisces about doing a disastrous drunken somersault in there to the strains of Caberet Voltaire’s ‘Nag Nag Nag’!

1989 saw visits from indie royalty The Happy Mondays, My Bloody Valentine and Sonic Youth. Then in October 1990 the Academy opens and ticket sales go through the roof. The Charlatans, Northside and New Model Army do two sell-out nights apiece. The LA’s, Paul Weller and Devo also stop by.

Which brings us back to where we started. It’s 1993 and I’m getting the breath shoved out of my lungs at my first ever Academy show: Smashing Pumpkins and Verve. Dad is making a pint last four hours over the road at Jabez Clegg. My plan to move to the city is a tiny seed in my fourteen-year-old mind.

This digital exhibition is full of great stories from true music fans: in 1968 a young audience member is gifted a harmonica by Captain Beefheart in the Main Debating Hall. In 1992 the drummer from Pavement confuses everyone by handing out carrots to the audience. In 1995 a sixteen-year-old Julian Cope fan gets a full snog with tongues from her hero in the Academy. Around the same time a clubber at Megadog spends the entire night in a toilet cubicle and has the time of her life.

This project is dedicated to those fans – to everyone who has taken the time to share a memory; to Manchester District Music Archive’s team of volunteers; and also to my dad, who took me to the Academy in the first place all those years ago.

Advert for Captain Beefheart taken from The Manchester Independent, 1968. Courtesy of the University of Manchester Students' Union

Advert for Captain Beefheart taken from The Manchester Independent, 1968. Courtesy of the University of Manchester Students’ Union

Notes:

• If you would like to contribute an artefact or story, just upload it to Manchester District Music Archive and we will add it to the exhibition.
• Only bands/artists from Greater Manchester are searchable in our database.
• If we are unsure of the exact venue the artefact relates to, or if it relates to several Union venues, we have used the tag Manchester University.
• Dates added to press articles refer to the publication date rather than the gig date.
• Gig ladders are usually dated with the earliest date on the advert.
• Due to time and budget constraints many press articles have been photographed quickly, sometime in poor light, rather than scanned.
• We’ve done our best to credit photographers and journalists clearly. Please give us a shout if we’ve missed something: info@mdmarchive.co.uk

In Conversation: Jon Savage & Abigail Ward talk ‘Second Wave Psychedelia’

Perfect_Motion_flyer_front_1024x1024

The Birds Nest Cafe – Shrewsbury Market Hall
Sunday 19th June, 2016

6pm-10.30pm
Tickets: £8 in advance
Buy here or from The Bird’s Nest Cafe

Jon Savage (writer, social commentator, broadcaster & author of England’s Dreaming/Teenage/1966) in conversation with Abigail Ward (Manchester Music District Archive).



Preceded with a rare showing of the iconic ‘Weekender’ short by Flowered Up at 6.30pm.

The topic will be late 80s early 90s ‘Madchester’ and the Baggy musical scene that defined it . Also under discussion will be the critically acclaimed album Jon produced for CTR last year –  Perfect Motion: A Secret History of Second Wave Psychedelia 1988-93 – and its distinctive take on the era.

The Stone Roses, their influence, legacy and reformation will also be on the musical agenda. A must for fans of the music and culture of that era!

Followed by music with DJs Jon Savage/Abigail Ward & CTR Guests.

Listen to ‘Perfect Motion’ here.

LATE TRAINS RETURN FROM SHREWSBURY to MANCHESTER: 21.30 – Arrive Manchester 23.40.

Tickets strictly limited – £8 Advance. Please bring a print-out of your order confirmation for entry.

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