Terminal Jive

Creative projects by Abigail Ward

Category: Curating (page 1 of 2)

Suffragette City, The Sequel

Building on the success of Manchester Digital Music Archive’s Suffragette City party last year, The Refuge will play host to a second women-focused two-floor event on Saturday 9 March 2019 to raise money for Women’s Aid and related groups.

Curated by Abigail Ward (Manchester Digital Music Archive), Rina Ladybeige (Social Service), Kath McDermott (BBC Radio 6 Music) and Chris Massey (Electriks), the party will boast a line-up of upcoming and established female artists playing multi-genre party starters in the Public Bar and the Basement.

PUBLIC BAR: 2PM TO 1AM

Free – no ticket required!
2-3pm: Paulette
3-4pm: Alex Zaklewska
4-5pm: SNO (Nongi Oliphant)
5-7pm: Abigail Ward
7-8pm: Denise Johnson (ACR)
8-9pm: Kirby
9-10pm BB (Supernature)
10-11pm: Emma Joyce (Disco Mums)
11-1am: Reeshy

REFUGE BASEMENT: 10PM TO 4AM

Hosted by The Social Service, £5 donation on the door for Women’s Aid
10-11pm: Kath McDermott
11pm-12am: Julie Wills
12-1am: Ladybeige
1-3am: Danielle Moore (Crazy P)
3-4am: Kim Lana

Abigail Ward said, ‘we want to build on the phenomenal success of last year’s Suffragette City party by putting together a fresh line-up of incredible female DJ talent whilst raising awareness of the barriers women can face in the music industry. We are fundraising for Women’s Aid, because we are keenly aware of the dwindling number of women’s refuges in the UK.’

We Are Dynamite! exhibition is open now at Niamos

John Sturrock © 1978 Hulme Tenants: Black and White Unite and Fight

Mon 3 September – Saturday 22 September 2018
MONDAYS TO SATURDAYS
10am-7pm
Niamos (former Nia Centre)
Chichester Road
Manchester
M15 5UP

*FREE*

The Northern Carnival against the Nazis, a rally and concert held on 15 July 1978 in Moss Side, Manchester, was a defining moment in establishing anti-racism in the city and beyond.

Dubbed ‘the day it became cool to be anti-racist’, the Carnival galvanised North West communities against racist groups, including the National Front. A rally of 15,000 people marched all the way from Strangeways prison to Alexandra Park joining a further 25,000 for an afternoon of music, dancing and unity.

Co-organised by Geoff Brown of the Anti-Nazi League (ANL) and Bernie Wilcox of Rock Against Racism (RAR), the Carnival featured incendiary live performances by pop-punk superstars Buzzcocks and Steel Pulse, the UK’s leading reggae band of the period. Support came from Moss Side reggae band Exodus (later X-O-Dus) and China Street from Lancaster, who had released a single on EMI called ‘Rock Against Racism’.

We Are Dynamite!  – an exhibition of unseen photos and ephemera curated by Abigail Ward – aims to highlight the passion and excitement of the day whilst inspiring visitors to reflect upon a new era of challenge for people opposing messages of racism and division across the world.

The exhibition will run from:
Mon Sep 3rd-Sat Sep 22nd (Mondays to Saturdays) 10am-7pm and is FREE.

To book a guided tour email: info@mdmarchive.co.uk

Please note: this is a community project in a volunteer-run venue.

We Are Dynamite exhibition launch. Photos: Aidan O’Rourke

Our project volunteers would like to speak to anyone who attended the march or Carnival. We are looking to capture memories, images and footage for our permanent digital exhibition. If you can help, get in touch: info@mdmarchive.co.uk

Photo: John Sturrock © The rally before Northern Carnival, 1978

Twitter:

#NorthernCarnival1978
@MDMArchive

Supported by by Heritage Lottery Fund

Thanks to National Lottery players, Heritage Lottery Fund invests money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife.

Supported by Futura

Futura are the north’s leading Rec2Rec headhunting specialists. Established in 2001, they provide experienced recruitment professionals to the very best recruitment agencies in the country.

Fleshback: Queer Raving in Manchester’s Twilight Zone

‘Fleshback: Queer Raving in Manchester’s Twilight Zone’ is a Boiler Room and British Council film uncovering stories from Manchester’s LGBT+ clubbing scene.

In the early 90s, Manchester’s queer scene was blown wide open by the Hacienda’s seminal queer party, Flesh and its progenitor Number 1 Club on Central Street. Aided, or some would say ruined, by hit TV show Queer as Folk, the scene entered the national mainstream a few years later.

The film explores this history while revealing all about those carrying the torch of alternative rave culture in the new era, featuring collectives such as Homo Electric, Meat Free, Body Horror, and High Hoops. Each has a different approach and musical feel, drawing in different crowds, yet sharing the same vision. The film uses archive footage to highlight the continuum between Flesh and the parties that are happening today outside of Manchester’s city centre.

The release of the film marks the 30th anniversary of the enactment of Section 28. Section 28 was the last piece of homophobic law in the UK. It stated that councils should not “intentionally promote homosexuality or publish material with the intention of promoting homosexuality” in its schools or other areas of their work. Section 28 was enforced in 1988 before it was repealed in Scotland in 2000 and then 2003 in the rest of the UK.

Steffi, DJ and promoter for Meat Free in Manchester, says, “People are very honest up North, and big movements don’t always wash with the Northerners. We’re not about branding or excluding people. Sexual identity is not at the forefront of our parties.”

Directed by Stephen Isaac-Wilson and produced by Anais Brémond.

We Are Dynamite! Exhibition Opening

Steel Pulse at the Northern Carnival © John Sturrock 1978

Steel Pulse at the Northern Carnival © John Sturrock 1978

Mon 3 September 2018
18:30 – 20:00
Niamos (former Nia Centre)
Chichester Road
Manchester
M15 5UP

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE

The Northern Carnival against the Nazis, a rally and concert held on 15 July 1978 in Moss Side, Manchester, was a defining moment in establishing anti-racism in the city and beyond.

Dubbed ‘the day it became cool to be anti-racist’, the Carnival galvanised North West communities against racist groups, including the National Front. A rally of 15,000 people marched all the way from Strangeways prison to Alexandra Park joining a further 25,000 for an afternoon of music, dancing and unity.

Co-organised by Geoff Brown of the Anti-Nazi League (ANL) and Bernie Wilcox of Rock Against Racism (RAR), the Carnival featured incendiary live performances by pop-punk superstars Buzzcocks and Steel Pulse, the UK’s leading reggae band of the period. Support came from Moss Side reggae band Exodus (later X-O-Dus) and China Street from Lancaster, who had released a single on EMI called ‘Rock Against Racism’.

We Are Dynamite!  –  an exhibition of unseen photos and ephemera – aims to highlight the passion and excitement of the day whilst inspiring visitors to reflect upon a new era of challenge for people opposing messages of racism and division across the world.

Join us for drinks and conversation from 6.30pm.

Special guests: Honey and Patrick from Exodus.

The exhibition will run from Mon Sep 3rd-Sat Sep 22nd 10am-7pm and is FREE.

Our project volunteers would like to speak to anyone who attended the march or Carnival. We are looking to capture memories, images and footage for our permanent digital exhibition. If you can help, get in touch: info@mdmarchive.co.uk

IMAGE: Steel Pulse at the Carnival (L-R) Basil Gabbidon and David Hinds © John Sturrock, 1978

Twitter:
#NorthernCarnival1978
@MDMArchive

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKETS HERE

Supported by by Heritage Lottery Fund

Thanks to National Lottery players, Heritage Lottery Fund invests money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife.

Supported by Futura

Futura are the north’s leading Rec2Rec headhunting specialists. Established in 2001, they provide experienced recruitment professionals to the very best recruitment agencies in the country.

 

Northern Carnival Against the Nazis: 40th Anniversary project launch

black-kid-with-bubblegum-at-Strangeways

Marchers at Strangeways © John Sturrock 1978

The Northern Carnival against the Nazisa rally and concert held on 15 July 1978 in Moss Side, Manchester – was a defining moment in establishing anti-racism in the city and beyond. The 15,000 people who marched across town and the 40,000 people who danced in Alexandra Park that day didn’t just make racism no longer respectable. They made it uncool.

Co-organised by Geoff Brown (the Anti-Nazi League) and Bernie Wilcox (Rock Against Racism), the Carnival featured incendiary live performances by Buzzcocks, Steel Pulse and Moss Side reggae band Exodus. They were joined by post-punk bands Gang of Four, Frantic Elevators and others, who played on trucks to accompany the marchers.

To celebrate this pivotal moment in Manchester’s fight against racism, Manchester Digital Music Archive and the Ahmed Iqbal Race Relations Resource Centre have brought together the original organisers of the Carnival for a panel discussion and all-day event exploring its impact and continuing relevance today.

This event will also be the official launch of our Heritage Lottery-funded project and exhibition celebrating the Carnival.

12.00 FILMS

A series of historical films introduced by Geoff Brown

Rock Against Racism: Nazis Are No Fun
Who Shot The Sheriff?
Leeds Rock Against Racism

13.45 BREAK

14.00 SPEAKER: Jaheda Choudhury-Potter & Ajah UK

14.15 FILM: A brand new short film on the Northern Carnival Against the Nazis, 1978

14.30 PANEL DISCUSSION

15.45 SHARING MEMORIES

Recording memories  – share your memories of the Carnival with our project volunteers

PANEL

RAMILA PATEL (Bolton Asian Youth Movement)

On July 15th 1978, Ramila Patel of Bolton Asian Youth Movement addressed a crowd of 15,000 anti-racism protesters that had amassed in the car park of Strangeways prison to march across town to Alexandra Park in Moss Side – the main site of the Northern Carinval Against the Nazis. Ramila was asked to give the address by Anti-Nazi League organiser Geoff Brown, following her brave stance against National Front leader Martin Webster at a previous demo, in which she marched alone in defiance of Webster holding a placard saying ‘This man is a Nazi’. Ramila is now Head of Visual Arts at Waterford Kamhlaba United World College of Southern Africa.

BERNIE WILCOX (Rock Against Racism)

Bernie Wilcox was the original organiser of Rock Against Racism in Manchester and was, with Geoff Brown of the Anti Nazi League, one of the instigators and prime movers behind the Northern Carnival Against The Nazis in 1978. Bernie has since forged a successful business career owning specialist recruitment businesses. Anti-racism, socialism and music are still close to his heart.

GEOFF BROWN (Anti-Nazi League)

Geoff became a revolutionary socialist at university in 1968, active in the campaign against the US war in Vietnam. His first arrest was for chalking slogans on his college wall, his second for obstructing a police officer at an anti-National Front protest. Joining the International Socialists (from 1977 the Socialist Workers Party) he moved to Manchester in 1972. When the Anti Nazi League was founded in late 1977 he became its Manchester organiser, helping saturate the city with leaflets, badges and protests and getting fifty coaches and minibuses, about 2,500 people, to the first Anti Nazi League/Rock Against Racism carnival in London in April 1978. Geoff went on to be a union tutor, working with shop stewards and on projects abroad, particularly in Pakistan. He was union branch secretary till he was victimised for his trade union activity, after which he was a part time official for his union, finishing in 2015. He is now active as a historian of Manchester ‘from below’.

Chaired by ABIGAIL WARD (Manchester Digital Music Archive)

Supported by by Heritage Lottery Fund

Thanks to National Lottery players, Heritage Lottery Fund invests money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife.

Supported by Futura

Futura are the north’s leading Rec2Rec headhunting specialists. Established in 2001, they provide experienced recruitment professionals to the very best recruitment agencies in the country.


Photo: Front row action at Alexandra Park, 1978 © John Sturrock

The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map

Lapsed Clubber Audio Map , powered by Manchester Digital Music Archive

Manchester Digital Music Archive  has teamed up with Manchester Metropolitan University to develop an online audio heritage map that will tell the story of the rave scene in Manchester in the words of clubbers, DJs, promoters, venue staff, producers and more.

The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map is a place for members of Greater Manchester’s original rave community to preserve and share their spoken word memories of clubbing and its culture during the ‘first decade’ of rave, 1985-1995.

Our interface allows you to record your voice directly into your desktop computer or laptop and pin 60-second sound clips onto a map of Greater Manchester at the exact spots where the events you are recalling originally happened.

You can also listen back to the memories of others.

Popular culture has referenced rave culture in Greater Manchester in print, in major films, on TV and in theatre, but almost always from the perspective of the well-known ‘expert insider’. Focusing on the raving landscape between 1985 and 1995, we are creating the Lapsed Clubber Audio Map with community input, giving the community the opportunity to write its own rave history.

Can you help?

If you went raving in Manchester between 1985 and 1995, we’d like to hear from you. We are looking for people who’d like to share some stories to help us test our map. We will send you a secret log in, allowing you to view and contribute to the map before it is launched. We’ll then ask you to feedback on your experience.

The memories are left anonymously with no username attached to them.

If you’d like to get involved, please email Abigail at info@mdmarchive.co.uk.

GEEK NOTE: This project is an experimental and evolving piece of work based on fusing third party protocols such as Google Maps and Web RTC. The latter, which is new open source software that allows you to record via browsers, is not currently FULLY compatible with iPhones, iPads and Safari. For the best experience, we recommend using a desktop or laptop computer running Chrome or Opera.

The Lapsed Clubber Project is a Heritage Lottery Funded Project based at Manchester Metropolitan University and run by Dr Beate Peter in partnership with Manchester Digital Music Archive (Abigail Ward), Go Bang Design (Ashley Kennerley) and Pin Studio (Paul Hemmingfield).

 

Queer Noise exhibition extended to November 2017

We are delighted to announce that our Queer Noise exhibition at the People’s History Museum has been extended to 5th November 2017 by popular demand,

The show has garnered great press support. Check out the links below:

6 Music interview (1hr and 40 mins into this broadcast)

The Guardian 

Another Man

The Mirror

I love MCR

Manchester Evening News

It’s Nice That

Queer Noise launch event

Flyer for Attitude at the Academy, 1990 Design: Homocult

Queer Noise Launch Night

People’s History Museum
Left Bank
Manchester
M3 3ER
Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:00 to 20:00
Book your FREE place

Join Manchester Digital Music Archive for the launch of our small but perfectly formed Queer Noise community exhibition at the People’s History Museum. Curator Abigail Ward will be in conversation with Rod Connolly and Zoë McVeigh (LIINES) – the DJ/promoter team behind Bollox Club – one of Manchester’s best-loved alt-queer hangouts.

Abigail will also deliver a lively visual presentation celebrating highlights from the history of queer music and club life in Greater Manchester. Material includes rarely seen photos, flyers, posters and videos from the 1950s to today.

In the foyer DJ Kath McDermott will play classic tracks from legendary queer nights Flesh at the Haçienda (1991-1996) and Homo Electric (1998-2002).

Performance artist Grace Oni Smith will be doing a 10-min projection-based ‘Welcome’ performance in response to the DJ set.

Fairtrade drinks provided by the Co-op.

Queer Noise tells the story of how proudly queer musicians and clubbers in Greater Manchester helped to redefine attitudes towards sexuality across the city and beyond. The exhibition is on display at PHM from July 1st until September 10th and is based on the digital project of the same name.

FUNDED BY HERITAGE LOTTERY FUND

Queer Noise: The History of LGBT+ Music & Club Culture in Manchester

Seventies secrecy in Salford pubs, joyous Gaychester resistance and cutting-edge, late-nineties, alternative club culture. Manchester’s musical LGBT+ history explored with exhibition and digital archive revamp:

  • Exciting, rarely-seen footage and photography from the dancefloor of the Hacienda’s famous FLESH club night evoke the unassailable spirit of ‘Gaychester’ in new exhibition
  • Photography from 1970s Salford and Manchester gay bars and the provocative, alternative dance scene of the millennium tell overlooked stories from the famous music city
  • Articles from influential fanzine, ‘The Mancunian Gay’ as well as flyers, badges and membership cards are retrieved from personal archives tell a tale of struggle, resilience and celebration.

The history of Manchester as a home for free expression and resistance through music, dance and culture is told through stories, unseen videos, photographs and rare artefacts drawn from the personal archives of the city’s LGBT community for a new exhibition, Queer Noise: The History of LGBT+ Music & Club Culture in Manchester, opening at the People’s History Museum between Thu 1 July – Sun 10 September 2017. As part of Never Going Underground 2017, a major exhibition marking 50 years since the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality, Manchester Digital Music Archive gathers notable artefacts, imagery and music to tell the story of how pubs, gig venues and dance floors gave rise to flourishing, creative and diverse scenes once known as ‘Gaychester’.

The small exhibition, a contribution to the museum’s larger focus on LGBT+ rights, coincides with the archive’s relaunch and drive to attract more music lovers to upload their artefacts, with the archive’s founders expressing concern that the vital LGBT+ and women’s histories are in danger of being lost forever without more collecting and sharing.

Punk provided an expressive sanctuary for LGBT+ communities in post-industrial Manchester as the wake of the Sex Pistols’ appearance in the city in 1976 left bands like Buzzcocks (fronted by openly bi-sexual, Pete Shelley) and clubs like The Ranch, a bar owned by renowned drag artist and entrepreneur, Foo Foo Lammar, to soak up the city’s disenfranchised youth. As well as photographs of the punk era, including contributions from Kevin Cummins, exciting, rarely-seen evidence of the otherwise well-documented dance revolution of the early 90s and the Hacienda’s legendary Flesh night also features in the exhibition. Shot from the Hacienda dancefloor, film featuring a travelling contingent from London club, Kinky Gerlinky, shot by film maker, Dick Jewell and up-close shots by Manchester photographer, Jon Shard, evoke a sense of unbound freedom in a community threatened by the oppression of Greater Manchester Police and ‘God’s Cop’, James Anderton.

In addition to the LGBT+ perspectives on these famous episodes in the city’s music history, it is the lesser known people and places that also find space in the considered selections of archive co-founder and curator, Abigail Ward.

Ahead of the exhibition, Ward says: “‘Queer Noise’ spans some of the most famous moments in the city’s cultural history, and highlights the incredible influence of queer artists, club promoters and fans. But queer club culture in this city didn’t just start with punk and the end at the Haçienda, it existed and thrived in the post-war period and continues to evolve today. The purposely provocative alternative queer scene of the late 90s reflects as many stories of true, expressive freedom as the remarkable footage from the famous ‘Flesh’ night at the Hacienda or images of Salford’s underground taken four decades ago.”

A Salford pub, the name forgotten, was captured by renowned musician, artist and photographer, Linder Sterling in the late 1970s and is the subject of three, unseen photographs loaned for the exhibition, alongside a further three shots of the inside of the notorious Dicken’s Bar on Oldham Street during the same period. As the popularity of Canal Street boomed at the turn of the millennium, DJs, musicians and dancers turned to smaller clubs on the fringes, giving rise to nights like the legendary, Homo Electric, eschewing the ‘glam’ of polished bars and commercial dance music for eclectic playlists in sweaty, run-down cellars. Candid footage of nights in much-loved, pre-Manchester regeneration clubs, like the demolished Legends, provides a window onto an electrifying subculture.

Ward continues:Manchester Digital Music Archive can trace some of these histories through the contributions of our LGBT+ members, but the exhibition also gives us a chance to reflect on the fact that more LGBT+ music lovers, and women in particular, need to share their memories and artefacts with us or face the prospect of their individual and shared histories going undocumented and unavailable for study by future generations. There are so many photos, posters, videos and other items out there waiting to tell incredible stories.” 

Manchester Digital Music Archive was established in 2003 to celebrate Greater Manchester music and its social history and has 2953 active users, uploading artefacts from their personal collections. A relaunch of the site, including updates to allow easier and more instantaneous smart phone uploads, has gone ahead to encourage the 30% female base of users to share more items as well as offering a potential solution to an evident shortfall in the number and range of uploads relating to the region’s current and historic LGBT+ music culture.

Drake Music Lab North West: New Musical Frontiers

CALL OUT TO INNOVATIVE MUSICAL JEDI EVERYWHERE!

Over the last few months I’ve been involved in an exciting project for Drake Music that has focused on introducing members of the hacker/maker/coding community to disabled musicians.

Four teams, each made up of both musicians and makers, have been commissioned to design a prototype for a brand new musical instrument that overcomes a specific barrier experienced by disabled musicians.

We’re going to be showcasing these brilliant ideas at two FREE events at the International Anthony Burgess Centre on Sat April 29th and Sat May 27th respectively.

Both events will be presented by the wonderful Kris Halpin (Winter of ’82), who will be talking about his own journey as a disabled musician-technologist and demonstrating his amazing MiMu motion-tracking gloves (see video!)

Seeing Kris perform live with the gloves is an unmissable experience. Watching him conjure strings out of thin air and kick start a drum sound with a single gesture is – quite simply – magical.

DMLab North West Challenge – Development Launch
Meet our teams and hear about their ideas.

When? Sat 29th April 2017 – 2-3.30pm
Where? International Anthony Burgess Foundation, 3 Cambridge Street, Manchester, M1 5BY
How? Reserve your ticket via Eventbrite

DMLab North West Challenge – Final Showcase
The final showcase where the four finished designs will be unveiled and played live.

When? Sat 27th May 2017 – 2-3.30pm
Where? International Anthony Burgess Foundation, 3 Cambridge Street, Manchester, M1 5BY
How? Reserve your ticket via Eventbrite

More info here.

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