Terminal Jive

Creative projects by Abigail Ward

Mauerstadt 30: Stories From The Berlin Wall

Sat, 9 November 2019
12:00pm – 3:00pm
YES, Pink Room
38 Charles Street
Manchester
M1 7DB

Saturday November 9th 2019 marks 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. This free afternoon event at YES, Manchester, celebrates that anniversary through live music, conversation and film, as part of the HOMOBLOC festival.

Mark Reeder & Beate Peter: in conversation

Manchester-born, Berlin-based producer, filmmaker and cultural catalyst Mark Reeder (B-Movie: Lust & Sound in West-Berlin 1979-1989) talks to Dr Beate Peter about Berlin’s underground music scenes in the years leading up to the fall of the Wall, and how he risked his freedom to bring punk to the East.

Abigail Ward with Howard Jacobs & Mandy Wigby: live music

Queer curator, DJ and co-founder of Manchester Digital Music Archive, Abigail Ward debuts new live material in response to the theme of the Berlin Wall with percussionist Howard Jacobs (808 State/Architects of Rosslyn) and synth torturer Mandy Wigby (Sisters of Transistors/Architects of Rosslyn).

Wes Baggaley & Margo Broom: live music

Toast of London’s queer underground, DJ Wes Baggaley (Fabric, NYC Downlow, Robert Johnson) and producer extraordinaire Margo Broom (Fat White Family, Meatraffle, Big Joanie) play a set of exclusive electronic music inspired by the Berlin Wall.

BOOK YOUR FREE TICKET HERE

More on Mark Reeder…

Mark Reeder is a 61-year-old Berlin-based producer, remixer, musician and filmmaker.

Born in Manchester and part of its late 70s punk scene, he moved to West Berlin in 1978 and immersed himself in the music scene there, becoming Factory Records’ German representative. He promoted the label’s bands Joy Division and ACR, whilst working as sound engineer and spending time with Nick Cave, Blixa Bargeld and other musical luminaries of the West Berlin scene.

In 1983, Reeder put together a Berlin Special of The Tube, which he co-presented together with Muriel Gray. This show featured music from both sides of the walled city. Mark risked his freedom to smuggle Western bands into East Germany, putting on illegal shows in churches at a time when the Stasi was attempting to crush the country’s nascent punk scene.

In summer 1989, Reeder was asked by East German officials if he would produce an album for up-and-coming East German indie band Die Vision for the state-owned record label AMIGA in East Berlin. He assumed at the time this was so they could keep an eye on him. Mark is now recognised as the only English person ever to have produced a record in the East, because days after finishing the album, the Berlin Wall fell.

This album was incredibly important to many East German kids, including Dr. Beate Peter. She will talk to Mark about this and many other things, including their shared passion for electronic music, Mark’s pioneering dance label MFS and his work with New Order.

In 2015 Mark was starred in a film based on his own life – B-Movie: Lust & Sound in West-Berlin 1979-1989. You can see a trailer for that film here.

We are grateful to the following organisations for their support: HOMOBLOC, YES, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester Digital Music Archive, Arts Council England, Economic and Social Research Council, RAH! Research in Arts and Humanities and The Lapsed Clubber.

The Lapsed Clubber Podcast: Recording the memories of Manchester’s original rave community

The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map is an online platform that allows members of Manchester’s original acid house community to share their spoken word memories of clubbing and its culture during the ‘first decade’ of rave, 1985-1995.

This podcast is a conversation between the project leaders Beate Peter and Abigail Ward, interspersed with memories from anonymous clubbers and tunes from the era. Beate and Abigail also discuss their own (occasionally tragic) early clubbing experiences in Berlin and Preston, Lancs, respectively.

The Lapsed Clubber Audio Map is a crowd-sourced digital heritage project led by Manchester Digital Music Archive and Manchester Metropolitan University, funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Once more into the breach

I have been awarded an Arts Council England ‘Developing Your Creative Practice’ grant. The grant is to help me reconnect with my practice as a musician, songwriter and performer. The loose plan is to get some mentoring, work with some great musicians, record and do some gigs. I’ll have some time to write and do some cool drifty thinking.

I’m really interested in collaborating with like-minded musicians/producers of all stripes. It would be nice to find a real artistic connection with someone who is on my wavelength musically. Having worked in record shops for so many years, I have a very varied collection, but in terms of how I write, it’s all about a sense of melody, melancholy and mystery.

I have made a brief mix of tunes that I feel represent a vague direction.

If you feel you may be interested in collaborating in some way, please email terminaljive@gmail.com

DJing at Come As You Are Weekender

Thrilled to be DJing at The Refuge not once, but TWICE over the Pride weekend celebrations. There are some great things happening here – take a look. 👀

DJing at Ned Doheny Live

Really happy to be DJing at the Be With Records 5th birthday party with James Holroyd, Jason Boardman, Kath McDermott, Jeff O’Toole, Wet Play crew, Be With family and Piccadilly Records

DJing at Dance Yrself Clean

Tom Quaye is one of my fave artists – his ability to capture the queer zeitgeist in ridiculous memes is second to none. So I was on cloud nine when he asked me to DJ at his ace club night DANCE YRSELF CLEAN, which is a colourful, inclusive LCD Soundsystem/DFA-inspired soiree at the PINK ROOM at YES, featuring one of the best soundsystems in MCR. Join us – it’s only a fiver. I will be playing a 2-hour marathon of pop, rave and house. Make a request at your peril!

Protest blog for People’s History Museum

Disrupt! Peterloo and Protest is the People’s History Museum’s year long programme exploring the past, present and future of protest. It marks 200 years since the Peterloo Massacre, a major event in Manchester’s history and a defining moment for Britain’s democracy.

Steel Pulse perform their song ‘Ku Klux Klan’ at the Northern Carnival Against the Nazis, Manchester, 1978. Photo: John Sturrock

To tie in with this, I’ve written a blog exploring Manchester protest music. It touches on Rock Against Racism, vegetarianism, Kinder Scout, Section 28 and more. Read it here.

Peterloo: Artivist GM commission

Still from Mike Leigh’s film, Peterloo

I’m excited to announce that I have been commissioned by Manchester Histories to create a piece of audio art that draws inspiration from the 200 year anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre and its accompanying themes of protest, democracy, freedom of speech.

I am one of ten artists chosen as part of the ArtivistGM project, which pairs creative practitioners with Greater Manchester archives. I will be working with the Working Class Movement Library, responding to their collection of minutes from the Manchester and Salford Women’s Trades Union Council 1895-1919.

ArtivistGM enables archivists and artists to collaborate in bringing a heritage collection to life, whilst creating new ways for the public to engage with the heritage of their local area.

The audio piece will be released in September.

Manchester and Salford Women’s Trades Union minutes.
Source: http://www.mswtuc.co.uk/

Field Music: live review

Field Music at the Imperial War Museum North. Photo: Bom Knights

Back in January I was given the opportunity to review a live performance at Imperial War Museum North by one of my favourite bands, Field Music. The band would be playing a specially commissioned song cycle written for the museum’s Making a New World season, which explores themes of remembrance and how the First World War has shaped today’s society.

For initial inspiration, the Brewis brothers were shown a ‘sound range’ image from the IWM archives that illustrates the very final moments of artillery fire on the Western Front.

Copyright: © IWM.

The band said, “The image shows the minute leading up to 11am on the 11th November 1918, and the minute immediately after. One minute of oppressive, juddering noise and one minute of near silence. This was the starting point for our suite of new songs. It was also the start of a new world.”

You can read my full review for Louder Than War here.

Suffragette City raises £3k for women’s charities

Suffragette City 2019 – the basement. Photo: Rina Ladybeige

It was a real joy to co-curate and DJ at second Suffragette City event at The Refuge. What a riot! It was rammed all day and night, upstairs and down, illustrating just how much appetite there is for women-led DJ events. I really enjoyed playing in the bar early on, and will post my mix soon.

second Suffragette City event at The Refuge. What a riot! It was rammed all day and night, upstairs and down, illustrating just how much appetite there is for women-led DJ events. I really enjoyed playing in the bar early on, and will post my mix soon.

The idea for the event started when Manchester Digital Music Archive put on a photographic exhibition at The Refuge celebrating women across all aspects of Manchester music. To close that show, we put on an all-women DJ party with help from Electriks and The Social Service, and it was a huge success. We raised a few quid for Women’s Aid and MDMArchive while we were at it.

Suffragette City 2019. Photo: Clare Angel

This year, we wanted to raise more, and so The Social Service team produced a set of specially designed t-shirts to sell, and these alone raised £965 for the Women’s Asylum Seeker’s Trust in Manchester. We raised a further £2k on the door of the basement party, which featured DJs Kath McDermott (BBC 6 Music), Kim Lana, Rina Ladybeige (The Social Service) and Danielle Moore (Crazy P).

We hope to make this an annual party! Thanks to everyone who supported, donated, promoted, danced, deejayed and wore a t-shirt.

DJ Emma Joyce. Photo: Clare Angel

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