Terminal Jive

Creative projects by Abigail Ward

Tag: Manchester Digital Music Archive

Suffragette City – The Music Event

Saturday March 10th 2018
3pm-4am

The Refuge
Principal Hotel
Oxford Road
Manchester
M60 7HA

As part of the Suffragette City – Portraits of women in Manchester music exhibition, The Refuge will be hosting an all day and night-into-early morning charity music event both to celebrate International Women’s Day and to close off the exhibition’s two-week installation in the public bar.

Music across two floors from an all-star female DJ line up.:

Love Is The Message
In the Refuge Public Bar
3pm – 1am
feat.
* Corinne Drewery (Swing Out Sister)
* Blasha & Allatt (Meat Free)
* Dance Lady Dance
* Abigail Ward (Manchester Digital Music Archive)
* Nongi Oliphant
* Claud Cunningham
* Kirby Leanne Halliday
* Justine Alderman

Move Ya Body
In The Refuge Basement hosted by The Social Service
10pm – 4am
feat.
* Rina Ladybeige
* DJ Paulette
* Gina Breeze
* Kath McDermott
* Disco Mums

There will be collection buckets on the night and a £2 door donation for the Social Service with all proceeds going to Women’s Aid and Manchester Digital Music Archive.

The Suffragette City exhibition is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund.

Suffragette City opening party

The Refuge
Principal Hotel
Oxford Road
Manchester
M60 7HA

Fri, 23 Feb 2018, 17:30 – 1:00

BOOK YOUR FREE PLACE FOR THE OPENING PARTY HERE.
(Booking is advised but not essential.)

Suffragette City is the culmination of a period of activity aimed at recognising and celebrating women’s achievements in the music industry. In the year we celebrate 100 years of Suffrage in the UK, we want to pause and highlight the roles women have played, bringing their voices to the fore. We set out to show just how vibrant, brilliant and influential women in music have been and continue to be.

This exhibition, curated by Manchester Digital Music Archive co-founder Alison Surtees, features photographic portraits of 25 key women in Greater Manchester music, including venue owners, sound engineers, record label managers, DJs and musicians.

Join us for the opening of our exhibition on Friday 23rd February from 5.30pm. Music comes from DJs Abigail Ward, Kath McDermott and Paulette, 5pm-1am.

Exhibition closing date: Saturday 10th March.

This exhibition is part of our ongoing project, Rebel Music – The Sound of Politics and Protest in Manchester and is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund.

#SuffragetteCityMCR
#MCRWomenInMusic
#RebelMusicMCR

Photo: DJ PAULETTE by ELSPETH MOORE

For more information contact: info@mdmarchive.co.uk

First show for NTS radio

On Sunday 10th December I presented the first ever Manchester Digital Music Archive show for NTS Radio. I had a brilliant time choosing the records, old and new. All have a Manchester connection. You’ll be unsurprised to hear it’s quite a contrary selection. There are plenty of stories to go with the music, because that’s what the archive is all about.

Harlem Spirit – Dem A Sus
The Eccentronic Research Council feat. Maxine Peake – Autobahn 666
Pete Shelley – Witness The Change (Dub Mix)
10cc – Blackmail
Georgie Fame and The Blue Flames – Music Talk
Moloko – Forever More
E Davd – Ice Moon
Shura – White Light
The The – Helpline Operator
The Smiths – Wonderful Woman
Lord Kitchener – If You’re Brown
Annette – Dream 17
Magazine – The Light Pours out of Me
Barry Adamson – Mr Eddy’s Theme 1
Throbbing Gristle – 20 Jazz Funk Greats
Al Green – How Can You Mend A Broken Heart?
JS Zeiter – JS05R
Floating Points – Peroration 6
Manicured Noise – Faith
Gerry & The Holograms – Gerry & The Holograms
Jane Weaver – The Architect
Nev Cottee – If I Could Tell You
Digital Justice – Theme from It’s All Gone Pear Shaped

Queer Noise exhibition extended to November 2017

We are delighted to announce that our Queer Noise exhibition at the People’s History Museum has been extended to 5th November 2017 by popular demand,

The show has garnered great press support. Check out the links below:

6 Music interview (1hr and 40 mins into this broadcast)

The Guardian 

Another Man

The Mirror

I love MCR

Manchester Evening News

It’s Nice That

Free training from Manchester Digital Music Archive

MDMA: Online exhibition menu

Manchester Digital Music Archive is an online community archive established in 2003 to celebrate Greater Manchester music and its social history. In September 2017 we are holding two (identical) training days on how to curate online exhibitions within our website/archive.

The events are part of our Heritage Lottery-funded project Rebel Music: The Sound of Politics and Protest in Manchester, which targets and celebrates women and members of the LGBT+ community, and their musical achievements.


Passionate about Manchester music, past and present? Got a story to tell?

MDMArchive Online Exhibition Training Day #1, International Anthony Burgess Foundation
Sep 23rd 2017
A relaxed training day led by curator Abigail Ward for people who are interested in creating their own online exhibitions within the Manchester Digital Music Archive website. Book your free place here.

MDMArchive Online Exhibition Training Day #2, International Anthony Burgess Foundation
Sep 30th 2017

A relaxed training day led by curator Abigail Ward for people who are interested in creating their own online exhibitions within the Manchester Digital Music Archive website. Book your free place here.

Please note: the content of the two training days will be the same.

Lovely lunch provided!

What is an online exhibition?
An online exhibition is a curated collection of digitised artefacts (scans, photos, images, audio, video) that anyone who has access to the internet can view. Online exhibitions are like physical exhibitions in real museums, but they exist digitally instead of in the ‘real’ word.

Abigail Ward, trainer & co-founder of MDMA, has been creating online exhibitions about Greater Manchester music since 2008. You can view some of hers here:

https://www.mdmarchive.co.uk/queernoise/
https://www.mdmarchive.co.uk/mosssidestories/
https://www.mdmarchive.co.uk/manchesteracademymemories

Who is this training day for?
This training day is part of Manchester Digital Music Archive’s Rebel Music project, which aims to celebrate and document the musical achievements of women & LGBT+ people in Greater Manchester. We are encouraging members of those communities to attend this training day and learn about how they can create online exhibitions with us. It will be accessible for anyone who is interested in Greater Manchester music, and has a basic standard of computer literacy.

What will this training day cover?
• An introduction to the work of Manchester Digital Music Archive
• How to digitise material using scanners, cameras and phones
• How to upload images, audio and video to MDMArchive
• How to curate a digital exhibition within MDMArchive
• How to share your work through social media

Queer Noise launch event

Flyer for Attitude at the Academy, 1990 Design: Homocult

Queer Noise Launch Night

People’s History Museum
Left Bank
Manchester
M3 3ER
Thursday, 13 July 2017 18:00 to 20:00
Book your FREE place

Join Manchester Digital Music Archive for the launch of our small but perfectly formed Queer Noise community exhibition at the People’s History Museum. Curator Abigail Ward will be in conversation with Rod Connolly and Zoë McVeigh (LIINES) – the DJ/promoter team behind Bollox Club – one of Manchester’s best-loved alt-queer hangouts.

Abigail will also deliver a lively visual presentation celebrating highlights from the history of queer music and club life in Greater Manchester. Material includes rarely seen photos, flyers, posters and videos from the 1950s to today.

In the foyer DJ Kath McDermott will play classic tracks from legendary queer nights Flesh at the Haçienda (1991-1996) and Homo Electric (1998-2002).

Performance artist Grace Oni Smith will be doing a 10-min projection-based ‘Welcome’ performance in response to the DJ set.

Fairtrade drinks provided by the Co-op.

Queer Noise tells the story of how proudly queer musicians and clubbers in Greater Manchester helped to redefine attitudes towards sexuality across the city and beyond. The exhibition is on display at PHM from July 1st until September 10th and is based on the digital project of the same name.

FUNDED BY HERITAGE LOTTERY FUND

Queer Noise: The History of LGBT+ Music & Club Culture in Manchester

Seventies secrecy in Salford pubs, joyous Gaychester resistance and cutting-edge, late-nineties, alternative club culture. Manchester’s musical LGBT+ history explored with exhibition and digital archive revamp:

  • Exciting, rarely-seen footage and photography from the dancefloor of the Hacienda’s famous FLESH club night evoke the unassailable spirit of ‘Gaychester’ in new exhibition
  • Photography from 1970s Salford and Manchester gay bars and the provocative, alternative dance scene of the millennium tell overlooked stories from the famous music city
  • Articles from influential fanzine, ‘The Mancunian Gay’ as well as flyers, badges and membership cards are retrieved from personal archives tell a tale of struggle, resilience and celebration.

The history of Manchester as a home for free expression and resistance through music, dance and culture is told through stories, unseen videos, photographs and rare artefacts drawn from the personal archives of the city’s LGBT community for a new exhibition, Queer Noise: The History of LGBT+ Music & Club Culture in Manchester, opening at the People’s History Museum between Thu 1 July – Sun 10 September 2017. As part of Never Going Underground 2017, a major exhibition marking 50 years since the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality, Manchester Digital Music Archive gathers notable artefacts, imagery and music to tell the story of how pubs, gig venues and dance floors gave rise to flourishing, creative and diverse scenes once known as ‘Gaychester’.

The small exhibition, a contribution to the museum’s larger focus on LGBT+ rights, coincides with the archive’s relaunch and drive to attract more music lovers to upload their artefacts, with the archive’s founders expressing concern that the vital LGBT+ and women’s histories are in danger of being lost forever without more collecting and sharing.

Punk provided an expressive sanctuary for LGBT+ communities in post-industrial Manchester as the wake of the Sex Pistols’ appearance in the city in 1976 left bands like Buzzcocks (fronted by openly bi-sexual, Pete Shelley) and clubs like The Ranch, a bar owned by renowned drag artist and entrepreneur, Foo Foo Lammar, to soak up the city’s disenfranchised youth. As well as photographs of the punk era, including contributions from Kevin Cummins, exciting, rarely-seen evidence of the otherwise well-documented dance revolution of the early 90s and the Hacienda’s legendary Flesh night also features in the exhibition. Shot from the Hacienda dancefloor, film featuring a travelling contingent from London club, Kinky Gerlinky, shot by film maker, Dick Jewell and up-close shots by Manchester photographer, Jon Shard, evoke a sense of unbound freedom in a community threatened by the oppression of Greater Manchester Police and ‘God’s Cop’, James Anderton.

In addition to the LGBT+ perspectives on these famous episodes in the city’s music history, it is the lesser known people and places that also find space in the considered selections of archive co-founder and curator, Abigail Ward.

Ahead of the exhibition, Ward says: “‘Queer Noise’ spans some of the most famous moments in the city’s cultural history, and highlights the incredible influence of queer artists, club promoters and fans. But queer club culture in this city didn’t just start with punk and the end at the Haçienda, it existed and thrived in the post-war period and continues to evolve today. The purposely provocative alternative queer scene of the late 90s reflects as many stories of true, expressive freedom as the remarkable footage from the famous ‘Flesh’ night at the Hacienda or images of Salford’s underground taken four decades ago.”

A Salford pub, the name forgotten, was captured by renowned musician, artist and photographer, Linder Sterling in the late 1970s and is the subject of three, unseen photographs loaned for the exhibition, alongside a further three shots of the inside of the notorious Dicken’s Bar on Oldham Street during the same period. As the popularity of Canal Street boomed at the turn of the millennium, DJs, musicians and dancers turned to smaller clubs on the fringes, giving rise to nights like the legendary, Homo Electric, eschewing the ‘glam’ of polished bars and commercial dance music for eclectic playlists in sweaty, run-down cellars. Candid footage of nights in much-loved, pre-Manchester regeneration clubs, like the demolished Legends, provides a window onto an electrifying subculture.

Ward continues:Manchester Digital Music Archive can trace some of these histories through the contributions of our LGBT+ members, but the exhibition also gives us a chance to reflect on the fact that more LGBT+ music lovers, and women in particular, need to share their memories and artefacts with us or face the prospect of their individual and shared histories going undocumented and unavailable for study by future generations. There are so many photos, posters, videos and other items out there waiting to tell incredible stories.” 

Manchester Digital Music Archive was established in 2003 to celebrate Greater Manchester music and its social history and has 2953 active users, uploading artefacts from their personal collections. A relaunch of the site, including updates to allow easier and more instantaneous smart phone uploads, has gone ahead to encourage the 30% female base of users to share more items as well as offering a potential solution to an evident shortfall in the number and range of uploads relating to the region’s current and historic LGBT+ music culture.

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